Reality


Through Open Eyes

2006

120 x 91 cm

Oil on canvas

The Soul Purpose

2006

122 x 91 cm

Oil on canvas

See No Evil

2006

120 x 100 cm

Oil on canvas

See No Evil, Hear No Evil, Speak No Evil

Oil on canvas

Consequences

2006

70 x 60 cm

Oil on canvas

HMS Pride (detail)

2006

121 x 93 cm

Oil on canvas

Bridge Of Genes

2006

145 x 108 cm

Oil on canvas

Cutting Edge

2006

105 x 82 cm

Oil on canvas

Eager Hands Meagre Hearts

2006

153 x 102 cm

Oil on canvas

21st Century Boy

2006

123 x 92 cm

Oil on canvas

Blatantly scattering his works with trademarks from brand names including Nike, Coca Cola and American Express as he tackles subjects such as drug abuse, sexual deviance, self-harming and the crucifixion, Griffiths’ work is destined to upset the big boys of business.

Mitch himself says he welcomes any backlash on his attack on the way we live our consumer driven lives:

“So what if the big brands don’t like the way I’ve used their image. They have to understand that their trademarks and logos are the icons of our time and as an artist, if I am to truly represent what I consider to be the biggest problems facing our society today, then it is only natural that these products and their related brand identities will come into play in my work. If I were hosting a debate on the effects of television, then I would have no compunction against referencing Big Brother or the dumbing down effects of daytime TV talk shows. The fact is that I am an artist and I deal with the instantly-recognisable visual to get my message across.

”Brian Sewell declares his work as being of “substantial authority” while David Lee, founder and editor of the satirical art newspaper “Jackdaw” and previously editor of the Art Review makes even bolder claims for Griffiths’ longevity and future success, saying that:

“In the future viewers of art will have far more idea of the way we live now and what tortured our thoughts from Griffiths’ work than they ever will from any Turner Prize winner”.

The work of contemporary artist Mitch Griffiths apprehends the viewer through a dissection of twenty first century existence.

Richly  detailed, viscerally layered canvases disclose scenes which simultaneously examine notions of empire, guilt, celebrity and first world entitlement; whilst proffering to expose the essential vacuity of a society drenched in mass media and consumed by consumption itself. Griffiths employs an unflinching high realism to pick apart ideas which promise to haunt with an unnerving familiarity.