Press


Below are a selection of recent press articles

Mitch Griffith's portrait of Ray Winstone

Emblazoned accross the facade of the Halcyon Gallery for The Promised Land

RAY WINSTONE, THE NEW FACE OF BRITISH ART

THE HARD-MAN ACTOR FROM ESSEX STEPS INTO THE FRAME FOR THE ARTIST MITCH GRIFFITHS IN HIS RADICAL NEW SERIES ON THE UNION JACK

MITCH GRIFFITHS' PROMISED LAND

The Halcyon Gallery welcomes Griffiths and his photorealistic paintings, exploring fame, nationalism and mass consumerism

Mitch Griffiths star studded exhibition

Opening in London’s Mayfair district is Mitch Griffiths star-studded exhibition ‘The Promised Land’ of 25 new paintings, 29 April 2010 – 05 June 2010.

Mitch Griffiths Muse is dead

One of Griffiths’ most famous paintings, called The Muse is Dead, takes the classical image of the muse and unsettles any preconceptions the viewer may have of this historic figure.

Life.com covers The Promised Land

People walk a tryptich by Mitch Griffiths at the Halcyon Gallery on April 26, 2010 in London

Halcyon Gallery continues its successful relationship with Mitch Griffiths

Mayfair's Halcyon Gallery continues its successful relationship with the Nuneaton-born artist, Mitch Griffiths, by hosting his latest show, The Promised Land.

India Times.com covers the promised land People walk a tryptich by Mitch Griffiths at the Halcyon Gallery on April 26, 2010 in London, England. Urban Junkies

It is hard not to appreciate the stunning realism of Mitch Griffiths’ paintings: his work is much like that of the Old Masters, but...

Gordon Brown Loses the vote of Ray Winstone

Ray Winstone has become the latest cinematic hard man to declare that he won't vote Labour.

The Independent covers The Promised Land

The latest exhibition by BP Portrait Award winner Mitch Griffiths uses a painting style reminiscent of the Old Masters to illustrate social issues in contemporary Britain.

Mitch Griffiths opens new exhibition of paintings

Old Masters-style artist Mitch Griffiths opens new exhibition of paintings

The work of contemporary artist Mitch Griffiths apprehends the viewer through a dissection of twenty first century existence.

Richly  detailed, viscerally layered canvases disclose scenes which simultaneously examine notions of empire, guilt, celebrity and first world entitlement; whilst proffering to expose the essential vacuity of a society drenched in mass media and consumed by consumption itself. Griffiths employs an unflinching high realism to pick apart ideas which promise to haunt with an unnerving familiarity.